Our next Village-Builder course starts Tuesday 19 October 2021! Come and join in

Our second Village Builder training course starts on Tuesday 19th October 2021. The course is all about how to build and enhance your micro-local community – your street, your neighbourhood, your block or whatever you choose. Over six week we will be using the six key elements of a Village In The City to help you see your local place through new eyes, asses what’s already going and the possibilities which may be out there already, and get you started on engaging with your neighbours (to whatever extent you choose).

“The Village Builder course helped me connect my own local experience with ideas from all over the world.” Leah Davcheva, Dragalevtsi, Sofia, Bulgaria

We are hoping for an international group once again, with people from around the world joining together each week to learn, compare notes and support each other.  The sessions are on Tuesdays at 6pm-7.30pm UK time, and are recorded so you can catch up if you have to miss some or all of a session.  Each week there is a short ‘challenge’ or task for you to connect the learning with your own place. Complete all the challenges and you will get a Village Builder certificate from Village In The City.

“Being a part of this online community was a game changer for me. Mark brought a wealth of experience to the table, which he shared over the six weeks in a systematic and engaging way, bringing out the best in each of us no matter where we happened to be building community.” Lynn Darke, Edinburgh

The sessions are led by Village In The City founder Mark McKergow. Mark is an internationally renowned trainer, facilitator and host, and his work on ‘leading as a host’ and solution-focused practice are in use in organisations, hospitals, schools and public services around the world. This is a wonderful opportunity to join Mark and fellow community builders to explore how we can all make a difference at a micro-local level. Mark is a Village Builder as well, in the West End of Edinburgh in Scotland.

“This seems to me to be all about rediscovering our humanity. The opportunity to share ideas with others, within Mark’s practical framework, does just that.” Roger Duck

Booking is now open for the Autumn 2021 course.  There are tickets at full price (£69) for those who can afford it, a concessionary rate of £25 for those less able to pay, and even free tickets can be had for those wanting to join in. There is even a full no-quibble money-back guarantee. Please book as soon as you can – the course starts on Tuesday 19th October 2021 at 6pm UK time.

“A brilliant course… the perfect village builder’s toolkit – thank you!” Gemma Boyd, Hainault, UK

Book now – places are limited. See you on the course. There are more details on the booking page. Any queries please email Mark at mark@villageinthecity.net.

Join the Celebrating Communities ABCD online Jamboree! Tuesday 7 September at 10am UK time

We are thrilled that Village In The City is part of the organising and hosting team for Celebrating Communities – the second UK Asset Based Community Development Jamboree! This free online event brings together the latest and best in ABCD work, this time with a Scottish focus, as we welcome ABCD community members and practitioners to gather to support each other, connect, get new ideas and applaud successes and learning.  It’s on Tuesday 7th September 2021 at 10am – 12.30pm UK time.

Places are limited. Register now at https://celebratingcommunities.eventbrite.co.uk.  

And yes, Mark will be there as a host, along with Leah Davcheva who will give a short presentation about her work in Sofia, Bulgaria.  And lots of other great ABCD folk.

Podcast #4 is out! The benefits of community with Sanderson Jones

Our latest podcast is out today! I am talking to Sunday Assembly and Lifefulness founder Sanderson Jones about the benefits of community, which turn out to be many, varied, and very well researched and established.  Do have a listen – Sanderson is an energetic and engaging speaker as well as a great friend of Mark’s and a supporter of Village In The City and our ideals of micro-local communities in urban settings (and indeed any settings) around the world.

The podcast is available through Apple and Google as well as on our own podcast site. Or you can just listen here.

 

 

Does your neighbourhood need a notice board?

In this age of Facebook and Whatsapp, Tiktok and Twitter, email and instant messaging, it’s easy to get carried away with the idea of digital communication.  In our first Village Builders course we’ve been talking about build connection, one of the six key elements of the Village In The City Manifesto.  Along with all the digital ideas, the community notice board has come to the fore as a very useful tool for the community builder.

Why? It’s very inclusive, visible to all who walk past.  It’s socially distanced – nobody needs to touch anything.  It’s controllable – usually someone chooses and curates which notices are displayed. It can (with a little effort) be made to look attractive and inviting.  A good notice board needs a little care and attention, but can give an excellent return on getting the word out – to locals and visitors alike.

We found this in Edinburgh – the council has three notice boards which went unattended through the first lockdown and largely featured fading notices about ‘rules of the park’ and what people should not do.  Here in the West End we (or at least my colleague Paul) managed to get keys from the city council to access the boards and restocked them with useful information about local contacts (councillors, MPs etc), local ‘hidden treasures’ like shopping streets and galleries, a link to a downloadable ‘Meet The Westenders’ tour of historical local characters which was devised some years ago and for which the pavement markers still exist.  We also post Community Council meetings and notes, local news from the free sheet and things like COVID vaccination and testing availability. And there is STILL room for the council’s information on trees and birds to be seen in the area. And of course our local neighbourhood Facebook group too.

You don’t need a posh stand-alone notice board to start making an impact.  Often shops will help display posters, and it’s good to look for local ‘bumping places’ where people congregate anyway. A notice board isn’t much use tucked out of the way where nobody looks at it!

Now read this useful and comprehensive blog about notice boards (from a company which makes and supplies them).  And think where you might get the word out in steam-powered and drawing pinned form.

How to talk to strangers

Talking to strangers is one thing that many people – including myself – have struggled with in the past.  It IS something you can learn to do better and more confidently.  Gillian Sandstrom of the University of Essex has researched this topic extensively and has an excellent resources page on her website (h/t to Eden Project Communities who ran an excellent online seminar with Gillian recently).

Some of the things that can make talking to strangers difficult at first might include:

  • What to talk about/say?
  • What if they don’t like me?
  • What if I get trapped into a long conversation I don’t want?

Fortunately, there are good answers to all these.

What to talk about

In the UK, the weather is the traditional starting point! This is not really a conversation about the weather though – as anthropologist Kate Fox pointed out in her excellent book Watching The English, this is a traditional and culturally acceptable way of asking ‘will you talk to me?’. It’s more interesting to look at what makes the weather such a good starting point:

  • There is ALWAYS weather – so a remark or question always makes sense
  • It’s a common factor for both of us (if we are in the same place) so some kind of agreement can be negotiated quickly (agreement is a great place to start!)
  • A remark about the weather can be answered in all kinds of ways, from no reaction to a grunt/nod to a more fully formed reply. All these give us different clues about how (or indeed whether) to proceed.

Something in common, something we share, is often a good starting point. Are we both over (or under) dressed for the conditions? Are we both in the line for a concert or movie?  Are we shopping at the same store?  Have we read the book the other is clutching? All these offer starting points.

Another way to start a conversation is to offer help or support to someone who seems to be struggling.  Reaching a high shelf, managing a heavy shopping basket, finding the way… if someone seems to be frustrated or unsure, a gentle offer of help may be very welcome. (Of course, if they don’t want help, that’s their privilege.)

How to build a conversation

Don’t try to impress the other person, show off, or act superior. Much better to take these simple approaches:

  • Smile and look interested! Tons of studies from Dale ‘How to win friends and influence people’ Carnegie onwards show that smiling and attentiveness are big factors in making a good first impression.
  • Encourage people to talk about themselves. Most people love to do this and very rarely find a place and willing audience. And whatever is their experience is their experience, it’s not a question of right or wrong. (And avoid jumping in with your own experience too quickly, especially if it’s very dissimilar to theirs.)
  • Ask for stories, not for facts. Facts are all very well but they are at best just ‘there’ or at worst the source of heated debate. Stories, on the other hand, are much more personal and interesting, and offer all kinds of opportunities to expand and develop. So, ‘how long have you lived here?’ is a fact question (but might be the start of something). ‘What do you like about living here’ is much more interesting and personal, and is a great jumping-off point.
  • Look for similarities, not differences (at least to start with). Points of connection, common interests, similar experiences, are all safe points to build a conversation
  • Ask for advice. This is a great way to build further. What’s a good place to buy paint? When are the recycling bins emptied? What’s a good place for a walk? People love to be asked. (And of course, in the moment you shouldn’t disagree or try to top them.  You don’t have to take the advice, but at least listen politely and enthusiastically.)

Ending the conversation

One of the things that stops people starting conversations with strangers is a fear of being trapped into a boring or tiresome exchange that you can’t get out of. Not to worry – there are plenty of ways to politely but firmly draw things to a close (for now at least).

  • Got to be somewhere Next – an end to the pleasant chatty Now (whether you really need to be there Next or not…)
  • Use the past tense: “It was lovely to meet you” signals that things are ending very soon, without any commitment to future encounters. (And of course you can still have future encounters if you like.)
  • “I mustn’t keep you…”. It is always polite to value someone else’s time highly, even if they don’t appear to.
  • Or simply “Well, it’s great to meet you! See you around.” This leaves all options open for the future. In Scotland, I had to adjust to the way everyone says ‘See you later’ when they don’t mean later, they just mean ‘Goodbye’.

(This section is taken from our Village Builder Handbook, version 4.)  The Handbook is available on the resources page of the website.

Setting up and running a neighbourhood Whatsapp group

What’s a good way to stay in touch with your neighbours?  A Whatsapp group is one way to start. This App runs on smartphones, and shares text and photo messages with everyone in the group., (Many people also use it for communicating with other individuals too.) Lots of street Whatsapp groups have started in the pandemic, and it’s now possible to share some specific learning and ideas about what makes them work well, stay positive and play a useful role in the lives of your neighbours.

My thanks to Sam Moon of Fine City Neighbours, a group set up in Norwich in England’s eastern counties, to help build neighbourly mutual support.  They have produced some excellent step-by-step guides for starting and sustaining neighbour Whatsapp groups, and I am delighted that he’s allowing me to share them with you.  Click on the links to access the free material.

How to set up a neighbourhood group using Whatsapp

An excellent template letter to invite people to join the neighbourhood Whatsapp group 

Top tips for moderating a Whatsapp group (this also applies to Facebook groups and similar) 

How to download and use Whatsapp on your desktop computer as well as your phone (from Whatsapp themselves)

My own top tips would be that the way you invite people, and the way you help to nudge and moderate the conversation, make a big difference to the way that the group sustains and supports the members, rather than either becoming a nuisance or sliding into disuse.  It may well be ok if nothing is said for weeks – as long as when something IS said, people are thinking Aha! rather than OMG…

(Acknowledgements to Sam Moon and Fine City Neighbours once again for creating and sharing this material.  If you know about other useful stuff for village-builders that’s out there, please get in touch!)

Village In The City is a post-COVID initiative to help you build micro-local communications and communities where YOU live.

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Our Contacts

20 Atholl Crescent, Edinburgh EH3 8HQ

+44 (0)7976 936086

mark@villageinthecity.net